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. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940» and the british and the french did what the germans expected, asz soon as the germans went
, marchand has no guilt about taking so much time off. in fact, it's the law. full-time workers in france are guaranteed at least five weeks vacation and a maximum 35-hour work week, with no paid overtime allowed. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. >> the aim is to keep your job without working. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. in this episode, we'll examine our relationship with work. how much is too much, too little, and who should decide? but before we look at the hours we spend on the job, we'll look at how employers tried to influence the way their workers act off the job. as morley safer reported in 2005, that cigarette or drink at home, that political candidate you supported, even your eating habits are coming under the scrutiny of your employer. if your boss doesn't approve, it might even cost you your job. >> anita epolito and cara stiffler were considered model employees at weyco, an insurance consulting firm outside of lansing, michigan. anita, 14 years on the job, cara, five. they sat side by side, sharing workloads and after work the
remember that was coming from the french colony. she was in algeria and came back to france. she had a very white skin. very, very white with speckles? >> freckles. >> freckles. more glamorous. glittering. but she was glamorous for me, sparkles -- no, freckles. sorry, i cannot say. [laughter] but she has beautiful red hair, light afro type but red hair. to me, i was like, oh, my god, she is so beautiful. for me, if i want to be friends with someone that i admire, i have to be like him or her, cannot have the red hair. so i say, i also come from nigeria and i am like you. [laughter] i do not think she believed me so i was inventing names. anyway. so she influenced me. she had white skin. you could see her veins. she was very strange but beautiful for me. i was always attracted by different beauty that i saw everywhere. i remember some movies called guess who's coming to have dinner tonight with sydney party. i remember i said to my parents -- i was 12. if i come with a black girl, what will you say? and they say, if you love her, that is perfect for you. years after when it told them what i
like. so i was like, let's say, killing the french fashion. i should say france in general. so absolute. it has to be like that. things that i did not feel like. i think it's time i was going, i felt really in love with london. i felt more freedom. when i was going there, it gave me -- [unintelligible] sending like, yes, go on to do the things you feel are good. because it is very conservative in paris. >> only you had come to san francisco. >> yes. >> i can only imagine what you would have produced. [applause] >> that is true. >> here is this good little boy who is be heading classically and is very charming and wonderful and working hard. how did you turn into a bad boy? [laughter] and tell us about the whole business of putting sexuality on the map, as it were. when you go into the exhibition here, it is still shocking to see some of the clothes which are suggesting a kind of pervert petit, never against women. you see a lot of flash and tattoos and in the clothing. it must've been completely taboo when you started doing the mine in 1970's and early 1980's. >> i think it was, yes. it
, he had been governor of virginia, ambassador of france, secretary of state, vice president of the united states, member of the congress. author of the decoration of independence. it's one of the few people in english history have been evaluated or inspected as closely as thomas jefferson was before he became president of the united states. people were looking at him and saying this is the guy we want. this is the person who should be president. >> host: the opponent said this isn't the guy we want. it was a close election. >> guest: it was. it was a strange election. >> host: it was strange election. it was hard fought. he had a lot of animation. you're saying, i guess what you're really saying is that both the supporters and the opponents knew who they were talking about. >> guest: partly that. what i'm saying is that especially when parties become ideological. any democrat is going different from any republican or any democrat is going different from any federalist. if you're measuring individual leader impact you shouldn't measure the democratic you should measure agains
money and asked -- it appointed john adams to go to france to borrow, to try to raise money in france from the french government to pay for the revolution. he decided to take his 10-year-old son john quincy adams with him, his oldest, his firstborn, the oldest of his three sons. john quincy adams buy then was a devoted patriot at 7-years-old when his father was in the continental congress. his mother abigail adams heard fire in the distance and she took her boy up to the top of the hill behind in quincy massachusetts so they could look across boston bay and they saw the battle of bunker hill. and she took her boy by the hand, came back down by the farm house and began melting down the family pewter to make muskets for the patriots and she told her son at the time you must rise to the head of your country, and if you don't succeed, it will be because of your own laziness and obstinacy. [laughter] you must make a revolution, resolution in favor of virtue, integrity and love of your country. and that's how john and abigail adams raised their way from the beginning, their oldest son come
to france to borrow, to try to raise money in france from the french government to pay for the revolution and he decided to take his 10-year-old son john quincy adams with his firstborn son, the oldest of his three sons. john quincy adams i then was a devoted teacher yet at seven years old when his father was in the cotton of congress. his mother, abigail adams, she took her boy to the top of the hill behind their farmhouse in quincy, massachusetts and they could look across boston date and so the battle of bunker hill. and she took her boy by the hand became back down to the farmhouse and begin minting on the family pewter to make musket for the patriot and she told her son at that time, she said, you must rise to the height of your country. if you don't succeed, it will be because of your own laziness, slovenliness in austin and this you must make a firm resolution in favor of virtue, integrity and love of your country. that is how john and abigail adams raised her boy from the beginning, the oldest son to be virtue is, honest and to let him serve his country. so when john adams was sen
. after 11 months, he was ready to return to america. he had gone to france as an illustrator, but he came home determined to be an artist. through his friends, homer was probably also introduced to the work of barbizon painters and other contemporary french artists, such as manet, whose work, in all likelihood, homer would have sought out while in paris. after his return from france, homer's subjects and the style of his work make clear he absorbed something from french art. return of the gleaner is strongly reminiscent of millet's well-known paintings. the lighter palette and two-dimensional design of homer's work at this point suggest that he may have seen manet's paintings with their strong light and flat patterns. homer's oil paintings of domestic american scenes called forth his deeper creative energies, but magazine illustrations of the same everyday activities provided his livelihood. the carefree quality of these scenes appealed to a country recovering from the civil war. americans turned to lighter concerns-- exalting the innocence of childhood, the therapy of the outdoors, the b
and france called for an enter introduction of a unified oversight while germany urged a gradual implementation. ministers also couldn't agree on how much supervisory authority to give the european central bank. they decided to meet again next week for further discussions. eu, economic, and monthly tear affairs commissioner said consolidation of oversight will be the first step towards a banking union. it will include a framework for bailing out nations with excess debts. he said failure is not an option. last month eu leaders agreed to allow the region central bank to supervise some 6,000 commercial banks in the eurozone. the goal is so set up a framework by the end of the year and launch the new system next year. now let's get a check on markets. tokyo share prices are trading in a narrow range. the nikkei is down 1/4 of a percent at 9,409, a loss of 24 points from tuesday's close. they're sidelining after taking profits if recent gainers at the open. they're refraining from major moves to confirm the next steps in the u.s. budget talks. the obama administration and opposition
aristocracy, the spirit of france. until the end of the 1980's. the designers of the 1980's. anyway, i was seeing that coutoure, made me dream. i realize that there were people that were not from coutoure but as good as coutoure. when i saw when i thought, i love it. it is nice in different. very creative. fabulous, ginzo. but i love coutoure. the way i was looking at magazines. i what -- i must say that my teacher was a journalist, explaining the clothing. now we call them stylists, which in reality was an editor, especially one which is a dead now. it was very inspiring. one from the magazine "elle." f fabulous, fabulous editor. she was mixing the close. she was doing something else than the panoply. matching, like in coutoure. she was taking an overall and putting with high heels and glamorous jewelry. i loved it. it shows me that you are not obliged. you do not have to wear the matching thing. coutoure, i saw similar things and making the dream, you know? instead, in myself, you know, i am sure that i was supposed to do coutoure. but at that time, there was no place. when i star
. it's the largest rink in france covering 1800 square meters. skaters can take to the ice every day until january 6th. so winter season kicking in. let's pull back and show you that france will still be seeing some wet and windy conditions. this is actually southwesterly winds that are dominating this area strengthening and making it a very wet scene, locally isolated rain will target portugal. temperature-wise not too bad. paris, 12 degrees for friday and saturday. on the rise he here in madrid at 14 degrees on your saturday, too. but the east is looking very chilly. kiev minus 5, moscow minus 9. that's for your high on friday. here's your extended forecast. >>> that concludes this edition of "newsline"." thanks for joining us.
the france where the thinker quarter gdp is showing growth of less than 1 is% for the whole 2012. stephane pedrazzi joins us now from paris. stepha stephane, not a great set of growth figures for france. >> no. that's because of the fourth quarter. now a contraction of 2% of gdp is being tracked. it believes the economy will improve marginally next year. its target, 1 mers increase for the first and second quarter of next year mainly because of flat consumer spending. you know consumer spending is the main growth driver in france, raising the prospect of the weaker expected growth next year again. the officials target for the government is at 0.8%. we might be below this target and if that's the situation, the government will need to find additional resources of budget cuts. this morning, the french president confirmed the deficit target of 3% for the next year. he also said that the unemployment rate should decline at the end of the year even if the next year will be a difficult one. in the meantime, french unions, and employers have decided to extend negotiations from competitive net in
the economic outlook amid uncertainties in europe and china. >>> some encouraging words from france's central bank chief about the eurozone economy. he says it's gradually regaining market confidence. bank of france governor christian noyer spoke in tokyo on monday. he said concerns over europe's debt crisis have now eased somewhat. >> the ures financial situation has improved over the past few months. long-term bond yields are long-term bond yields are falling sharply in spain, for instance, and showing positive signs, among others, that point to a gradual return of confidence to the euro area. >> noyer noted borrowing costs for spain, france and other countries in the region have declined that he pointed out is due in part to a european central bank program to buy bonds of debt-ridden nations. the governor also said a stable bond market is necessary for every central bank to implement effective monetary policy. >>> most nuclear powers plants in japan are offline after last year's disaster. another energy-saving campaign is now under way to avert power shortages this winter. the government a
to france, he went to france, decided he fell in love with french architecture and he rebuilt it. when he got tired that he built another mansion outside of lynchburg. then he spent $30,000 on a meal in a canal at the bottom of monticello mountain. said that never really restrained him from anything that he wanted to do. one of the historians who studied, i think it was -- stephen, said if jefferson hadn't decided to make it rather reckless investment of $30,000 in an outcome he probably would've been able to ride out the financial storms of the early 19th century. and another analysis of the financial records show that jefferson, a slaves actually were very productive farmers. and that in one of the first decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson lost very little money on his farming operation. and so, the slaves were really holding their phones when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and h
was ready to return to america. he had gone to france as an illustrator, but he came home determined to be an artist. through his friends, homer was probably also introduced to the work of barbizon painters and other contemporary french artists, such as manet, whose work, in all likelihood, homer would have sought out while in paris. after his return from france, homer's subjects and the style of his work make clear he absorbed something from french art. return of the gleaner is strongly reminiscent of millet's well-known paintings. the lighter palette and two-dimensional design of homer's work at this point suggest that he may have seen manet's paintings with their strong light and flat patterns. homer's oil paintings of domestic american scenes called forth his deeper creative energies, but magazine illusations of the same everyday activities provided his livelihood. the carefree quality of these scenes appealed to a country recovering from the civil war. americans turned to lighter concerns-- exalting the innocence of childhood, the therapy of the outdoors, the benefits of leisure
lead shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in a stormy chicago, shriver's name and came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on the flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family still grieving from the recent death of robert raised an objective in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success and repairing the alliance with france weekend by a disagreement about the vietnam war had prompted president nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when the democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimination designated sargent shriver as his choice for vice president. the election was a disaster from the governing shriver who only one massachusetts and the district of columbia. but perhaps the final word came 18 months leader as the watergate scandal unfolded in the bumper stickers appeared today to read an ou
king is trying once again to win over tastebuds in france, after a 15 year absence from the country. in the world open a branch at the more silas' airport over the weekend. >> bringing it in another chance the market average closed nearly 40 locations in france in 1997 cells were poor. >> it is also planning a second location in the country in 2013. >> a slight increase in brighgas prices. >> the average price for a gallon of gas regular gas is $3.62 in san francisco. >> in san jose $3.53. and $3.52. in oakland. the average across california $3.54. >> and a reminder of the bay area favorite way bring in new year is always with kron 4. the biggest partisan spectacular fireworks will be on kron for new year's live show. it's hosted by catherine heenan and gary radnich . kron fours news live start at 1130 on new year's eve. >> welcome back the time is 4:14. >> there is plenty of snow off to the side in the lake tahoe area. resort are reporting lots of fresh powder. we are talking feet of fresh powder. and outlets and by three has also been downgraded from and several to moderate. >> i
through paris and france and europe and exchange music was traveling aboard as well and i got the experience some of the music he speaks of and it was enjoyable, so i wish him the best of luck on that. as far as the conditions that were listed, there is an extensive list, however nothing out of the ordinary for a venue replacing the blue m cc aw, the only issue that mr. einselen brought up that we spoke about was number 3 on your list, i think that was just semantic, it states patrons must be visually and audio recorded, strike the audio, that was a clerical error, if you will, and again, you also addressed many of the same thoughts we had as far as business plan, what kind of venue he's promoting, what kind of crowd he's bringing in, it's excited to see the outcome, so if you have any questions. >> it's long. but nothing out of the usual, i don't think. >> do you know what kind of clothing you want the security staff to wear? >> the clothing is just something that distinguishes them easily from patrons. >> [inaudible] and striped shirts. and a mustache. >> and a baguette. >>
the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people -- i know you have been to the academy of arts and all the students, but i wonder how many people in this au
:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting
confidence and trust in the eurozone. >> countries like france and italy have pat -- have pushed for a speedy resolution. banking supervision paves the way for a direct supervision -- direct injection into ailing banks. >> it is no longer the sole responsibility of the member states. rather, all of europe will step in. >> but president hollande did not get everything on his wish list. germany insisted that smaller banks, which make up a large part of its banking system, be overseen by national authorities, and it got its way. >> it is important to have a clear division between banking supervision and monetary policy. >> the supervisor will begin work in march, 2014, and be responsible for banks holding more than 30 billion euros in assets. the deal should ensure european taxpayers no longer have to foot the bill when financial institutions find themselves in trouble. >> i'm very satisfied. contrary to expectations, the 27 finance ministers have managed to save the european council. >> as for the question of who will succeed john graja and kurt as head of the eurozone, that is something member
assesd.d. he f f f f f f should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say prior to the fukushima accident, the operators only implemented the safety measures that were legally required. he said it's dangerous for plant operators to rely only on state regulations and that they should be encouraged to voluntarily enhance safety. the chairman of the nuclear regulation authority says he's not satisfied with the safety awareness level in japan's nuclear plants. shunichi tanaka says the country must boost those measures by listening to the advice of foreign experts.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> criticism of this week will be taken as a more than 100,000 celebrated the launch in pyongyang, including officials from the korean workers party and military. the party secretary said claims by the u.s. and other parties that the rocket is ballistic missile is false. it has been released and is orbiting earth. south korean officials say it had an estimated range of 10,000 kilometers, enough to reach the u.s. west coast. >>> south korean forces have retrieved
is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say prior to the fukushima accident, the operators only implemented the safety measures that were legally required. he said it's dangerous for plant operators to rely only on state regulations and that they should be encouraged to voluntarily enhance safety. the chairman of the nuclear regulation authority says he's not satisfied with the safety awareness level in japan's nuclear plants. shunichi tanaka says the country must boost those measures by listening to the advice of foreign experts. >>> north korea says any criticism of the rocket launch they carried out this week will be taken as a declaration of war. more than 100,000 celebrated the launch in pyongyang, including officials from the korean workers party and military. the party secretary said claims by the u.s. and other parties that the rocket is ballistic missile is false. it has been released and is orbiting earth. south korean officials say it had an estimated range of 10,000 kilometers, enough to reach the u.s. west coast. >>> south korean forces have retrieved a portion of t
the vi was crowned the sing of france. from the sound of 8,000 pipes in 1894, napoleon was crowned emperor. music is integral to the life of the cathedral, and in the festival to celebrate 850 years, they will bring to life some of the christianity's oldest sounds contained in the oldest maunts. >> the musical school of notre dame was influential. we know it innewsed music across europe, spain and italy. >> but you have no idea how delighted quazi moto was. the bell told to mark the hours of the day as it told to mark the liberation of the city in 1944. >> in front of notre dame and even in one of the towers of the famous cathedral, the nazis have established fire. >> we traveled west of paris to normandy to this village, to one of three bell foundrys still in operation. here they are casting the eight new bells to hang in the to your. >> the original bells were seized during the revolution and melted to cannon balls. they are recasting them in copper and continue using molds fashioned from horse hair and ma nuria. >> as we don't want them to make them twice, we will make them high
, to struggle against the oppression of my people and to struggle against the racism. >> france is seen 19th consecutive rise of consecutiveto 3.1 million people -- consecutive rise in unemployment to 3.1 million people. >> times are tough on the french high street, which means second- hand stores are doing good business. many shoppers came here to buy their christmas presents. now that the holiday is over, the trade is in the opposite direction. >> i have been waiting for people to bring back their christmas present. >> the manager is preparing for a busy few days as people discover they received gifts they do not want or brought -- bought things that cannot afford. >> we have to explain to people we can't give full price for the items they bring in. the shop has to provide. we try to make just a small margin on new goods. >> it is an expensive time of year. the school holidays have another week to one, and keeping children occupied can be a costly business. many families can't afford to take them ice skating or to the theater. at times when people are tightening their belts, it is the litt
considered for an ambassadorship to either england or france. you can bet i have something to say. and i really do. california tax pain could be arizona's gain. we talked to a mayor who's trying to lure businesses away from the formerly golden state. a reporter with the sporting news doesn't like tattoos. and says most quarterbacks do not have them. now, he's being labeled racist because of those remarks. we'll talk to him next hour. yeah, he's here. remember, we want to hear from you, send you e-mails varney@foxbusiness.com and please comment on tattoos. i personally hate them. now, seven early movers-- somebody is olling their eyes off camera. and pep boys post a loss on weak sales and down it goes. the drug maker jereon, says it has stopped developing its treatment for brain cancers and cut the work force by 40%, there it goes. and dividends for the next three quarters and all of them early, the stock is now up. and profit rises at the home builder, toll brothers and the company said new orders rose sharply. up goes the stock. and tellabs, another special cash dividend. up it goes. t
class of course, and i will even throw in a stopover in tax happy france. here is how piers morgan puts his threat to leave, quote, i can spare those americans who want me deported a lot of effort by saying this, if you don't change your gun laws to at least try to stop these relentless tidal waves of murderous carnage then you don't have to worry about deporting me. i'll have my take on piers morgan in our next hour or so. clearly, i've got a dog in this hunt, i am english, i'm an immigrant, et cetera, et cetera, and i've got a strong opinion on pierce morgan. let's go back to kelly jane, what do you think of piers, my good fellow. >> is anybody crying about this, is anybody worried that piers morgan is it going to leave? you know, i hate to be -- i hate to be snarky, but i think that people were very surprised when he got that slot after larry king in the first place and his show has been most successful in giving people things to laugh at the day after. stuart: ooh, that was good, kelly jane. that was really nasty. . [laughter] thank you very much indeed. >> i love the english, i lov
wine. you get in a car in paris, go 90 miles east and you'll be in a beautiful park in france. but they're not the only people and place you can get sparkling wine from. i brought five fantastic sparkling wines. it's a party now. they come from different places in the world where sparkling wines come from. they're all $20 or less. you don't need to spend a lot of money to have a lot of fun. >> let's go through them. cava from spain is $9. i drink a lot of that. >> this sounds like a law firm in barcelona. some of the most amazing sparkling wines and values come from spain and it's only $9. it's made like a champagne but doesn't cost lime one. >> how much is that? >> it's $12. it's absolutely a party in a bottle. >> if you go to italy, whether you're in rome or venice, you'll see literally everybody on new year's eve walking around with it. this is a very good one. >> and then a sparkling wine from australia. >> it's unusual. >> yeah. i've never heard of that. >> people think of australia gives us chardonnay and others. this is jacob's creek. ice made exactly like a champagne, chardonnay
was then to move on to our primary on zwrektives beyond the beach. more deeply into france and norman normandy. i was assigned to the general. we went to paris. it was a very warm welcome to the americans that they saw. the french were delighted. they threw flowers and kisses and so on. after the liberation of paris, our mission was to move rapidly eastward where general patton and his tank was moved rapidly and we followed him and the liberation of belgium, luxembou luxembourg, and into holland. in december of 1944 we were getting close to the time of the battle of the bulge. we then got back to our artillery forces and support groups and we proceeded to attack and cross into germany. >> and our thanks to mor mort waitzman for sharing this story. >>> coming up, the venezuelan president was just elected this year. so why he is already announcing who he wants to replace him? details ahead. >>> but first a look in new york this morning. a beautiful shot there. good morning to you, early birds. thanks so much for starting your day with us here at cnn. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the
in his life is this one right here. who is that? >> guest: that's his second wife, frances louisa tracy, whom he married about three years later, 1865, just at the end of the civil war, right after lincoln was shot and the war was concluded. that was an ok marriage for maybe 10 or 15 years. they had four children, who were also in the picture you just held up, but very quickly, it became clear that they had very different tastes and very different instinct. he loved new york, he loved throngs of people, he was a workaholic, he liked activity and travel -- adventurous travel. she was much more domestic and quiet. she liked being home with the children, she wanted to leave new york for suburban new jersey; she wasn't very interested in art, he was passionate about art. so after about 15 years, he kind of kept the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in
in france, a high court has now just struck down a 57% income tax rate on the richest citizens they're saying it's excessive and unfair and unconstitutional. the ruling is a huge blow to the president who had promised during his campaign to raise taxes on the wealthy. katherine field is a correspondent for global radio news and joins us from paris. what did the courts say about this. >> reporter: good morning. the constitutional court said in essence that the tax failed to recognize a quality before public burden. it was going to applied to individuals rather than households. the courted noted that the top rate would apply to a married couple a as if one member were in the income bracket and 57% rate would not apply. so in essence this controversial tax is being rejected on a technicality. it's embarrassing for the socialist president alleand. you know just despite the court is saying the government has not backed down and was within the last few hours and saying the law will be tree ree drafted to con forp with the court's ruling. nevertheless, there is spill widespread support for
he used performance-enhancing drugs. when that ban was imposed, armstrong's seven tour de france victories were erased. armstrong has signaled that he has no intention of 'peeling the ban before today's deadline. >> and some of the french folks armstrong may have rode past are breaking a holiday season taboo and selling their unwanted presents. >> they might be on to something there. that's exactly what they were doing at this store in paris yesterday. patrons saying it's better than regifting. and during tough economic times, they've got a point, any bit of money really counts. >> and 52% of french people are planning to make money from their gifts. and maybe the other 48% are lying about it. here's the deal. you all know you've gotten a bad christmas present before. i have family members, you will remain nameless because we're on national television right now, and you're like, what am i supposed to do with this? and if you could make some money off of it, i would think they would be happy for you if you could make money off of it. instead of just throwing it out. >> regifting i
airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the movers and shakers. they wanted me to predict the next 100 years. i refused. i went ahead and i wrote an article and i picked these people and i was fortunate enough to have met all but two of these people. i think these were the ones that come to me, were the ones that really made aerospace in that first 100 years. if you do not know korlov, he was the van braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courage to try something really hard, and that is why they did the accomplishment. my first b
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